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Enjoying the Realism of Flute VST Plugins

 

If you know anything about audio production in general and music production in particular then you will know that this industry has witnessed revolutionary changes. There was a time when the cost of music production was exorbitant and only affordable to the rich or record labels.

The reason for this was simply that the cost of owning and operating a recording studio ran into hundreds of thousands of dollars. As you can see from the history discussed here, expensive hardware gear had to be purchased, acoustic structures put in place and music instruments and other back lines purchased and installed.

The story today has radically changed and with a few thousand dollars, one can set up a simple studio from which they can produce professional level music and audio projects.

This has largely been because of the availability of practically any hardware equipment in software form. This means that instead of purchasing gear for tens of thousands of dollars, you can get a software version for just a few hundred dollars or less.

This brings us to the core of our focus in this article which is the VST platform, one of the platforms on which these software also known as plugins operate.

 

What is a VST Plugin?



The first question we should probably ask is; what is VST? We will begin by answering this first question.


VST is an acronym that stands for Virtual Studio Technology and is a platform that facilitates the virtual replication of traditional studio hardware and instrument functions by digitally processing these signals using software called plugins.


VST, which was developed by Steinberg, is simply one such platform which allows plugins built by different brands to be usable across different DAWs (Digital Work Stations) and operating systems that support VST.


You can find a more detailed explanation here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_Studio_Technology.



How to Make the Right Choice



VST plugins can be created for practically anything today. We have virtual effect processors, microphones simulators, amp and cabinet simulators and of course virtual instruments.


Our focus in this article falls under this last group – virtual instruments.


These plugins eliminate the need for studios to have live musical instruments and the challenges that come with effectively recording them. While large studios that can afford it can still use these hardware and live approach, small studios can now compete at the highest level with top quality emulations of these.


In this case, a home or project studio does not have to get a professional flutist to be able to record a flute track. The biggest challenge that many used to have with these virtual instruments was the fact that they did not always sound realistic.


With improved sampling technology, the level of realism that can be achieved toady is nothing short of mind blowing.


To help you choose from a flute VST list that will ensure you get the best virtual representation of a flute sound and performance, we will look at some things to consider while making your choice.

 

Sample vs Emulation

 


This is easily the very first thing you should consider when choosing a virtual flute instrument. An emulation plugin will consist of a synthetic representation of the natural instrument’s sound achieved through precise programming expertise.


On the other hand, sampling will actually record the instrument extensively, capturing the varied nuances of its play along with different ambiance and microphone settings.


Most producers prefer the sampled versions because it is easier to achieve a high level of realism with them. They however come at some cost.

 

Size

 


This is another thing you should consider. While discussion sampled versus synthesized virtual instruments, we mentioned that using the sampled versions come at a cost. Well, this does not just refer to cost in terms of purchasing price.


A VST flute plugin that consists of sampled sounds will have a much larger space requirement because the sample libraries are usually huge. The synthesized variations on the other hand will require far less space.


You should therefore make your choice with this in mind.



Expression Options

 


An instrument like the flute has a lot of expressions and effects that can be achieved while playing it naturally. This can be the result of microphone positioning or actual playing techniques.


Considering this still brings us back to the issue of choosing between a sampled sound and a synthesized one. The sampled sound will usually include as much expression types as possible – whether it is the result of microphone positioning or playing technique.


You need to understand that the more the expression options that are available to you, the easier it will be to achieve a very realistic flute performance in your production.

 

Ease of Use

 


Now, this is something that is very crucial in music production. While choosing plugins, you need something that can easily be incorporated into your existing setup.


This may be a USB keyboard with its expression pedals and other accessories. It may also simply be a midi controller from which your trigger your samples. Whatever your setup and DAW is, you need a plugin that will fit easily into it.


If you really want to get a very clear picture of what we’ve been discussing above, then you should read this article.



Conclusion

 


Music production has really grown in leaps and bounds. You are basically no longer restricted by budgets, space and inability to play some instruments. If you know exactly the sound you want, chances are that you can find a plugin you can use to achieve it.


In this article we focused on the flute and believe you have gotten some important information that will help you choose the right plugin for your next production.

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Believe it or not Pandora is a great music outlet that can provide artist with a very nice royalty income but a lot of artist don’t submit their music to this outlet. Artist forget that Pandora is still one of the most widely used free music streaming services with over 50 million listeners. So lets get to the brass tax, here are step by step instructions on how to get your music on Pandora.

1. Sign up for a membership at PEEKSOUND webite. We make the process go faster. Pandora is in our network of digital outlets so the approval process will happen faster.

2. Go here: Submit music to Pandora

3. Create an account

4. Once you create an account sign into your account

5. Enter your name, phone number, select “Artist” and hit the next button

6. Enter your music’s information, links and so on.

7. Make sure you copy the UPC code that we inboxed you in your dashboard and paste it you the UPC field. Also make sure you copy and paste your Apple Music/iTunes URL in the “Release Streaming Link” field

8. Click the next button and submit

It usually takes Pandora a few days to a week to approve your music so be patient.
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We at PEEKSOUND get questions asking us “how do I get my music into YouTube’s music & content ID system and collect my royalties?”.

Here are step by step instructions:

1

Upload Your Music or Music Video through PEEKSOUND

Use PEEKSOUND website to submit your tracks, music video, artwork, and release information quickly and easily.

2

We’ll Send Your Music to Youtube

We will release your music to the content ID system in addition to all the other stores like iTunes, Spotify, and everything in between.

3

Get Paid

Every time your track or music video gets streamed, you get paid 100% of your royalties.

Earn 100% of your royalties from your streams on YouTube.

With over 180 million active users per month and counting, YouTube is the most popular video streaming services in the world, you make it easier for fans to connect with you and your music.

 
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It’s not simple finding good music reviews currently, especially with the proliferation of blogs and social media where everyone who is anyone can pipe up with their two cents worth of knowledge about whatever they want to say about the latest Ting Tings B-side…however, you should not give up hope. There are still great music reviews out there, you just have to search a little harder to find them, among the ether of sub-standard sites and WebPages.

The finest thing to do is to rely on word of mouth recommendation from people who you trust and once you find a site that delivers top quality reviews, stick with it! Pick your genre and search the web for reviews in artists in that genre, then just spend a few hours comparing and contrasting the various writing styles until you find one that you like! Of course, if you find one that you like at once, then count your lucky stars and stick with that one…

Everybody likes diverse styles of music, but what the great thing is about the various sites that showcase music reviews is that you can be convinced to listen to new material by the power of the reviewer’s writing; you never know, you may find out a whole new style of music for you to explore and enjoy, just by reading a short, bright review!

So, go and test out all the sites that the World Wide Web has to offer and when you have found one that you like, don’t leave it, either keep retuning to it or sign up to its mailing list…have fun!

Those who write music reviews are nearly always music lovers, and they will repeatedly listen to a piece of music again and again to determine all the nuances and sensations the piece can offer. Depending on the music reviewer, their opinions might or not be objective.

Music reviewers are in the business of ranking music, and occasionally a music review will include a comparison of songs or albums to an artist’s preceding releases. A music review may include the writer’s opinion on whether or not the piece will be a hit or a flop, whether it is worth the asking price, and whether or not the artists ought to expect to have prolonged existence in the music business.

Often, the proficient music reviewer will specialize in reviewing music that is of a particular genre. For example, those with expertise in classical music will not usually waste much time listening to and reviewing hip-hop music. Nor would an expert in folk music be qualified to review a punk rock concert. However, some music reviewers are true music lovers with a deep level of sophistication and appreciation for all kinds of music. Those who truly understand that music is an artistic expression should be able to judge the music on its own merit, and form an objective opinion.

Sometimes a music reviewer will be necessary to give an unbiased opinion, even if the reviewer does not in person care for the piece. If the reviewer feels that there is some audience for the piece and it deserves a good review, the objective reviewer with experience and good sense can set aside his personal preferences and honor the piece with an honest review.  

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Many people want to get involved in the television or film industry. The good news is that there has never been a better time in history to have your music featured onscreen. The proliferation of equipment at affordable price points means that just about anyone can make films and shows. There are a few questions to ask if you want to have your work featured.

1. Will the film be seen at festivals?

When it comes to the number of films being made, the flip side of the coin is what will be done when they are completed. If the project never sees the light of day, then your music will not be featured.

2. Where will the film be shown?

Think about whether it matters to you if the film is seen on YouTube, is going to a festival circuit, or if there is a theatrical release date. Some films and shows stream only on services like Netflix. This still offers a good chance for people to hear your music, but it’s a good idea to find out the creator’s intentions. You’ll want to be able to point to something and say ‘yes, my music is in this film’ because it will help you with future gigs.

3. What is the remuneration?

The new indie scene tends to equal little or no pay. Most of the people working on films don’t make much money. When you first start out, you have to be willing to offer your music for little to nothing for exposure. However, don’t let this run your life. Everyone in the creative arts should be paid for what they do, so try to make sure you choose wisely when deciding on the projects you’re willing to do for free.

4. How can I connect with creators?

This largely depends on where you are based. One great resource is Facebook groups in places that are industry-heavy, such as New York, LA, or London. Filmmakers are often looking for composers or music for their projects. Hunt around until you find the most reliable groups in these areas, and you’ll find that people are always looking for music. Make sure that you have a website where samples of your music are readily accessible when the time comes.

5. Should I cold-contact directors?

Dozens of other composers will contact directors. Don’t let this deter you. Many creators find that their composers drop out or they are in need of music for something. They will often remember that you emailed them and get in touch. One of the surefire ways of getting their attention is to specify your interest in their projects. If you already know and appreciate a director’s work, you’re more likely to get a response. This is partly because everyone likes to work with people who are familiar with their past projects, and also because people who know their work are more likely to be offering appropriate music. Creators are often looking for the perfect music. Most people work for a long time before they find their way into big-budget television and film. Composing soundtracks is a particular talent that takes hard work and experience. If a director wants to use your original songs, this usually happens because they like your sound or a song you’ve written is perfect for their film or television show. Most directors of big-budget films and shows are inaccessible unless you have an agent, but you’d be surprised at how far networking at the indie level can get you. Your music will find its way into films, and with enough exposure online or in the festival circuit, you’ll build up an impressive portfolio that will open doors to the TV show or film of your dreams.
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In the internet age, it’s easier than ever for a musician to put themselves out there and share their art. However, there are many new artists trying to make names for themselves in a huge industry. There are common mistakes that many of them make that can hinder their chances of making it big. However, while such a low barrier of entry to becoming an artist means that everyone has a shot, this means that more than ever emerging artists need to avoid making mistakes that could prevent their success. To help emerging artists have the best shot possible, here are 5 of the most common mistakes they should avoid making in their early careers.

They Have the Wrong Motives

A common mistake emerging artists make is that they often have the wrong motive. New artists need to ask themselves, are they in it for the music? Or are they looking for fame? While it’s ok to be motivated by success, primary motivation should stem from a love of music and share your talent. Being passionate about music is the only way to ensure success. If you are more motivated by fame than your music, the quality of your work will suffer. If your primary motivation is not your love of music, you will falter early on in your music career.

Not Thinking About Their Name

When emerging as an artist it is important to take some time when coming up with a name for yourself or your group, as your name is the brand you will be trying to sell to the public. For instance, if you are a solo artist, do you want to be known by your birth name, or do you want to create a stage name for yourself? Choosing a distinct name can help to set you apart from others in the industry and make you more recognizable, particularly if you have a common name. If you are part of a group, it is particularly important that you take time to think of your name. You will want to come up with a group name that is unique and original, yet won’t be off-putting to audiences. In particular, you will want to avoid having obscenities in your group name, as this can limit your audience and make it difficult for people to safely search for your group on Google.

They’re Not Marketing Properly

It can be easy to digitally distribute your music using platforms such as iTunes, Spotify, and other digital music websites. It is also important not to forget to market your music. You should have a presence on various social media platforms including Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and Music Blogs. These are marketing tools that you need to master and stay on top of as they will be your best way to reach new audiences. These platforms will bring in new followers and will expose new audiences to your music helping you to expand the reach of your music.

Spamming on Social Media

It is important to stay on top of social media accounts. It is also important that you do not overuse these platforms and inundate your followers with constant updates. Social media can be a useful tool. However, if you update each of your accounts ten times a day with similar updates, you will inundate readers and potentially turn off followers. Finding a balance is key when using social media. It is a balance many new artists have a hard time finding. Keep your updates frequent but original, and do not post an obscene number of times a day.

They’re Not Taking Advantage of YouTube

Perhaps the most important tool available to emerging artists is YouTube. While this may seem obvious, one cannot underestimate the power of YouTube and its role in creating new stars. YouTube truly is the new radio, allowing artists to reach audiences of hundreds of millions of people. This makes it important that you regularly update your Youtube with new material. Share these updates on your social media accounts to increase your exposure.
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Mixing and mastering are two terms you often hear as part of the music production business, but it’s not always obvious what the difference is to a novice. Like technical terms in any industry, it’s easy to assign your own definitions to these two terms, even if you’re way off base.

A Yummy Analogy

Imagine baking a cake and then frosting it. What did you do? Well, you mixed up the ingredients, put it in a pan, baked it, cooled it, then frosted it. If you took it to a party right then, people would eat it and enjoy it. It would be a just-fine dessert. Now imagine that after you baked it and it cooled, it went to a Cake Master sort of person who used fondant, multiple types of frosting and even props to turn it into a work of art. When you took that cake to the same party, people would ooh and ahh over it, but ultimately, they’d eat it and enjoy it. Now imagine that, instead of a cake, it’s your song. You take your various tracks, lay them on top of one another and spit out a version that people can listen to. Yes! You made a song! But now imagine there’s a Music Master who can take what you did and layer on some musical fondant and yummy frosting. They can turn it into a real treat for the ears. That’s the difference between mixing and mastering.

What is Mixing Really?

When you mix a song these days, you use editing software to closely examine each of your tracks, then you layer them or “mix” them into a full song. Usually, you examine each track by itself first. Do you need to make any edits? Did one of the backup singers cough at some point? Did your drummer suddenly play louder for 5 seconds then go back to his previous level? There is a lot to consider on just one track. The mixing part begins once you add in a second track, then a third. So, you take your drum track, your vocal tracks, and your various other instrument tracks, and you work with them until just the right amount of each is heard when played back all together. There is both an art and a science to it. Sometimes, you want the drums to suddenly feel louder for a section, or you want the lead vocals to sound more hushed. There are a lot of different things you can do with even basic audio editing software, minor tweaks and adjustments you can add, but your main goal is to hear all the right things at all the right times. Let’s now assume you are putting together an album of ten songs. You go through and mix each of them until you are happy with the results. At this point, you could distribute your songs if you wanted to. After all, a cake with basic frosting is still pretty yummy, but what if you want more? What if you really want a polish on it all? Many artists consider mixing good enough for something like a demo tape but turn to mastering when they’re ready to distribute and share with the world.

So What is Mastering Then?

Whereas mixing focuses on the elements of a particular song, mastering takes a larger view of the entire album. Mastering is considered an art. The difference between a painting of a bowl of fruit at the flea market and one that hangs in a museum. The average person can’t always tell you what’s different between the mixed and mastered version, but they can tell you the mastered version is better. So what happens in mastering? The very basics are that the levels across songs are managed in a pleasing way. Have you ever noticed how songs across a good album seem to rise and fall at just the right points? That’s mastering. That’s just the beginning though. Mastering also gets into adjusting reverb, compression, equalization, and a host of other elements, including doing some optimization to try to ensure a good listening experience across a wide range of devices.  The goal of mastering is to refine and enhance the story your album is telling. While some artists feel reasonably comfortable mixing their own music (others give this task to professionals too), most serious musicians believe using an experienced mastering professional is the only way to go. Working with such a professional doesn’t come cheaply, but it’s often the difference between good and wow. Between would-be fans listening once and playing it on a loop. That’s the very basic differences between mixing and mastering.
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Disruption is rapidly becoming the norm as advances in technology completely remake industry after industry. The music industry is no exception. Even though it has already undergone massive change over the past 20 years as CDs then MP3s then iPods pushed listeners to adopt newer (and not always better) technologies, streaming services have introduced a level of disruption far beyond a simple change in media or device type. Streaming services are changing the industry itself.

Setting the Stage

Like most industries, music is fueled by money. Where and how money is spent by listeners drives almost every aspect of the commercial music business. In its latest revenue statistics, the RIAA paints a clear picture that, in 2017, streaming services have emerged as the primary revenue drivers. In fact, streaming services accounted for a full 62% of revenue in the first half of 2017. Paid streaming services also dominated across all three of the streaming payment models, including ad-supported and digital radio. With this clear game-changing information in mind, let’s take a look at what this impressive impact means for the world of music.

Changing Definitions

No matter the media type, vinyl, tape, CD or even MP3, the definition of an “album” remained relatively constant for a very long time. Put X number of songs together, ideally have a theme of some sort, and sell them as a collection. In the world of streaming, it is far more likely that someone else is curating the content. Someone else is taking songs from multiple artists and placing them in a collection according to whatever criteria they set. Playlists on platforms like Spotify and Apple Music have millions of followers. New songs added to one of these lists can generate levels of interest at speeds unheard of years ago. What constitutes a ‘song” has also changed. No longer are there radio-imposed time limits or chatty DJ-inspired intros. While there is still, generally speaking, some common sense guidelines around song length, there are also people willing to listen to much longer songs these days. Artists are no longer limited by traditional song guidelines.

Changing the Record Labels

Artists all over the world stood up and cheered when Chance the Rapper won the Grammy for best new artist recently. Guess who didn’t cheer? Traditional record labels. Chance the Rapper’s success flies in the face of an old and successful model. A model whereby you can’t make it big without a record label behind you. Although it was already clear that artists could achieve some amount of financial success with a streaming-only album, winning a Grammy for one sends a very different message: In this world of peer reviews and artist-driven content, maybe the entire record label concept isn’t necessary anymore? Because of this, the larger entertainment industry is pondering that thought now, including TV and film. As the ability to produce professional content at a local level gets easier and cheaper, we’re likely only at the very beginning of a monumental shift in how our entertainment reaches us. Of course, the labels aren’t taking this sitting down. They used to have experts that guided artists on how to get play time on the radio. Now they have experts who guide artists on how to get added to the right streaming playlists for their audience. For every Chance the Rapper, there are 10,000 unknowns who never make it big. It’s just like there was in the days of radio. What’s different now is that it’s possible to make it without a label, where once it was not.

Last Track

There are many other changes that streaming services are forcing in the music industry, from availability and price of equipment to the entire “manager” concept. But when you consider that streaming has changed the rules of the three most fundamental aspects of music – the song, the album, and the record label relationship – it’s clear that we’re in the midst of a renaissance unlike any other in our lifetimes.
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How Do I Submit My Music On A Spotify Playlist For Free We receive a lot of emails asking this question on how to submit your music on to a Spotify playlist so we decide to write a post about it. Before submitting your music to a curator make sure you have verified your Spotify artist account. Here is how to get your artist account verified on Spotify.  As an independent artist you want to get as many listeners as possible and a good way to get more streams and possibly gain more followers is to get your music on a playlist. So after a little searching we came up with a list of Spotify curators: 1. Indiemono  Indiemono is the biggest Spotify curator we found, they have a playlist for all genres of music and they love breaking new artists, especially if you have less than 1,000 streams.. You can browse all the playlist to see what playlist fits your genre of music and submit your music. Once you find the playlist that fits your music just click the submit button. Here is a link to Indiemono playlist browser. Biggest playlist: Sad Songs (370,000 followers) Total playlist followers: 1.1 million 2. Soundplate Soundplate has a great selection of playlists curated by their team for pretty much all genres. I really liked their submission process it just was hard to find the playlist browser for the site. Here is the playlist browser. Biggest playlist: Selected : Soundplate (2,000 followers) Total playlist followers: 10,000 3. Spingrey Spingrey has playlist for several genres and you can submit your music by following their collaborative playlist but Spingrey charges a membership fee anywhere between $1 to $250 depending on what level you choose. Here is how to become a member of Spingrey. Here is the playlist browser. Biggest playlist: it’s LIT (27,000 followers) Total playlist followers: 150,000 4. Simon Field Simon is a successful producer/artist and he curates one of the largest independent playlists on Spotify for electronic music. The playlist is hosted on Simon’s artist profile on Spotify. When submitting by email keep it short and include Spotify URI. Submission link: promo@homebrewprod.com Biggest playlist: Ibiza Deep House (100,000 followers) Total playlist followers: 106,000 Above is just a few curators we found that artist can submit their music too. If you are looking for more Spotify curators just do a search for “Spotify Curators” and you should be able to find more Spotify playlist to submit your music too.
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How To Get Your Spotify Artist Account Verified

Our goal at PEEKSOUND is to provide artist with all the tools we can to help them become as successful as possible. So we decide to write a post on how to verify you Spotify account.

What is Spotify Verification

Getting verified on Spotify lets your fans know that your artist profile belongs to you. When you get access to your Spotify for Artists, you’re automatically verified on Spotify. You need to have a Spotify account to get access to Spotify for Artists, I’m not sure if you have to have a paying account or if you can use your free account. If you don’t have a Spotify account, you can set one up when you’re getting access. Once you’re verified and have access to Spotify for Artists, you’ll get a blue check mark on your profile and be able to:
  • Update your artist image anytime you want
  • Post artist playlists to your profile
  • Make an Artist’s Pick, which appears at the top of your profile
It can take a few days for the Spotify team to review your account. Once you’re in, it can also take a little time for your blue verification check mark to appear on your profile maybe a day or two. There is no minimum amount of followers you need to have, verification is available to every artist now which is great because at one time you needed to have 250 followers to get your account verified. Another cool thing is that if you are a record label and want to verify your artist you can verify them one at a time and see them all in your Spotify for artist dashboard.

How to get your account verified

  1. Go here: Spotify for artist
  2. Type the artist name or the Spotify link for the artist(s)

  3. Click the artist name

  4. Link the artist account to your account.

Once your account is reviewed by the team at Spotify you will receive an email letting you know if the artist has been link to your account. Now just download the Spotify for Artist app: iPhone or Android 

How Do I Submit My Music On A Spotify Playlist For Free
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